recent
Hot News

Sentence Structure

Home

Sentence Structure

Sentence Structure


REMINDER
Sentence Structure Reminder


An independent clause expresses a complete thought. It can stand by itself as a sentence.
A subordinate clause has a verb and its subject but does not express a complete thought. It cannot stand by itself as a sentence.

SUBORDINATE 
  • when the doorbell rang [This thought leaves the reader asking, “What happened when the doorbell rang?” The thought is not complete.] 
INDEPENDENT 
  • The doorbell rang. [This thought is complete by itself.]

Depending on its structure, a sentence can be classified as simple, compound, complex, or compound-complex.

Simple Sentences

A simple sentence has one independent clause and no subordinate clauses.

EXAMPLES 
  • The water sparkled in the bright sun. [one independent clause] 
  • The reeds by the lake rustled and whispered in the wind. [one independent clause with a compound verb: rustled and whispered]

Compound Sentences

A compound sentence has two or more independent clauses and no subordinate clauses.

Like simple sentences, compound sentences do not have any subordinate clauses.

EXAMPLES 
  • We fished during the morning, we napped during the afternoon, and we hiked around the lake during the evening. [Three independent clauses— we fished, we napped, we hiked—with their modifiers form one compound sentence.] 
  • Later, clouds gathered, and a storm seemed likely. [Two independent clauses—clouds gathered and a storm seemed likely—form a compound sentence. Each independent clause could be a sentence by itself.]

NOTE

Sentence Structure Note


Simple sentences can be joined to form compound sentences in one of three ways: 
  1. Use a comma followed by one of the seven coordinating conjunctions (and, but, for, nor, or, so, yet).
    Example: Seth was tired, but he kept working anyway. 
  2. Use a semicolon.
    Example: I’m having some juice; would you like a glass? 
  3. Use a semicolon followed by a conjunctive adverb or transitional expression.
    Example: Water the hanging plants daily; otherwise, they will dry out and wilt.

Complex Sentences

A complex sentence has one independent clause and at least one subordinate clause.

The subordinate clauses may be an adjective, a noun, or an adverb clause. A complex sentence may also have other modifiers or phrases.

EXAMPLE 
  • Unless we use the avocados today, we will have to throw them away because they will go bad. [A subordinate clause, Unless we use the avocados today, introduces the independent clause, we will have to throw them away. The complex sentence ends with a second subordinate clause, because they will go bad.]

Compound-Complex Sentences

A compound-complex sentence contains two or more independent clauses and at least one subordinate clause.

EXAMPLES 
  • Place the paper, which has already been used, in the recycle bin, but leave the other art supplies out. [Two independent clauses—Place the paper in the recycle bin and leave the other art supplies out—combine with the subordinate adjective clause which has already been used to make a compound-complex sentence.] 
  • Until the entire art area is cleaned up, the students may not leave; therefore, everyone works quickly to get the job, which no one particularly likes, done. [This complicated sentence combines two independent clauses—the students may not leave and everyone works quickly to get the job done—and two subordinate clauses, an adverb clauseUntil the entire art area is cleaned up—and an adjective clausewhich no one particularly likes.]
author-img
Mr. ‏El-Sayed Ramadan ‎ ‎

Comments

No comments
Post a Comment
    google-playkhamsatmostaqltradent