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Noun Clauses

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Noun Clauses

Noun Clauses


A noun clause is a subordinate clause that is used as a noun. A noun clause can function in any way that a single noun can function.



  • Does someone know where we pick up the tickets? [The noun clause is the direct object of the verb Does know.] 
  • Please hand a blank form to whoever does not have one. [The noun clause is the object of the preposition to.]

NOTE

Noun Clauses Note


Noun clauses are usually introduced by a word such as 
how,
that,
what,
when,
which,
who,
whom,
or
whose.
 
The introductory word often has a function within the noun clause, such as serving as the subject, direct object, or predicate nominative

When who/whom and whoever/whomever are part of a noun clause, their function in that clause determines which form to use, not the word that comes before the pronoun

EXAMPLE 
  • Concert seating is free to whoever wants to attend. [In the noun clause, whoever is the subject of the verb wants. The entire noun clause is the object of the preposition to.]

TIP

Noun Clauses Tip


Adjective clauses and noun clauses can both begin with 
that,
which,
who,
whom,
or
whose

Remember that an adjective clause describes a noun or a pronoun, while a noun clause performs the function of a noun in the sentence.
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Mr. ‏El-Sayed Ramadan ‎ ‎

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