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Adverb Clauses

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Adverb Clauses

Adverb Clauses


Adverb Clauses

An adverb clause is a subordinate clause that modifies a verb, an adjective, or an adverb.

Like single-word adverbs, adverb clauses tell how, when, where, why, to what extent, or under what conditions. Unlike adjective clauses, which follow the words they modify, adverb clauses can appear at the beginning, in the middle, or at the end of sentences. However, they are easy to identify because they begin with a subordinating conjunction.
Common subordinating conjunctions include

after,
although,
as if,
as long as,
because,
before,
since,
so that,
unless,
whenever,
and while.

EXAMPLES 
  • Before the biologist sampled the water, she dropped a dye tablet into the test tube. [The adverb clause tells when the action of the sentence occurred. The adverb clause begins with the subordinating conjunction Before.] 
  • She scooped up a few tablespoons of water so that she could examine it in the lab. [This adverb clause begins with the subordinating conjunction so that and tells why she collected the water.]

NOTE

Adverb Clauses Note


You may have noticed that when an adverb clause begins a sentence, it is followed by a comma. The comma marks the end of the adverb clause and the beginning of an independent (or main) clause.

Elliptical Clause

Part of a clause may be left out when its meaning can be clearly understood from the context of the sentence. Such a clause is called an elliptical clause.

As long as the meaning of the sentence remains clear, certain words—often the subject, the verb, or both—can be omitted from the adverb clause.

COMPLETE CLAUSE 
  • Frances runs more often than Mike runs
ELLIPTICAL CLAUSE 
  • Frances runs more often than Mike. [Both sentences and both adverb clauses mean the same thing. In the second sentence, the verb runs is understood, though not expressed.]

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Mr. ‏El-Sayed Ramadan ‎ ‎

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