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Uses of Comparisons

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Uses of Comparisons

Uses of Comparisons

Comparative and Superlative Forms

Use the comparative degree when comparing two things.
Use the superlative degree when comparing more than two things.

COMPARATIVE 
  • Both Pamela and Craig gave speeches in history class. Pamela’s speech was more interesting. [Two speeches are being compared.] 
SUPERLATIVE 
  • Of all the speeches in history class, Pamela’s speech was most interesting. [More than two speeches are being compared. Pamela’s speech is being compared to all of the speeches given in history class.]

Include the word other or else when you are comparing one member of a group with the rest of the group.

ILLOGICAL 
  • Pamela worked harder than any student in the class. [Pamela is a student in the class. Logically, Pamela cannot have worked harder than herself.] 
LOGICAL 
  • Pamela worked harder than any other student in the class. [One member of a group is being compared with the rest of the group, so the word other is used.]

NOTE

Uses of Comparisons NOTE

When comparing one member of a group to each of the other members, use the comparative form. When comparing one member of a group to all of the members of the group, use the superlative form.

COMPARATIVE 
  • Leo swam faster than the other members of the team, Carl, Nina, and Ashley. [Leo is being compared to each of the other members of the team. He swam faster than Carl, he swam faster than Nina, and he swam faster than Ashley.] 
SUPERLATIVE 
  • Leo is the fastest swimmer on the team. [Leo is being compared to all of the members of the group.]

Double Comparisons

Avoid using double comparisons.

A double comparison occurs when two comparative forms (usually –er and more) are used together or when two superlative forms (usually –est and most) are used together.

NONSTANDARD 
  • The curtains for the kitchen window should be more shorter than those for the dining room window. [More shorter is a double comparison.] 
STANDARD 
  • The curtains for the kitchen window should be shorter than those for the dining room window. [Shorter is the correct comparative form.] 
NONSTANDARD 
  • A cheetah can run more faster than any other land animal. [More faster is a double comparison.] 
STANDARD 
  • A cheetah can run faster than any other land animal. [Faster is the correct comparative form.]
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Mr. ‏El-Sayed Ramadan ‎ ‎

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