HOLT Vocabulary Workshop Fourth Course - Lesson 29

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HOLT Vocabulary Workshop Fourth Course - Lesson 29

HOLT Vocabulary Workshop Fourth Course - Lesson 29



CONTEXT: The Environment

Wordsworth and the lake District 

Frequently, writers are closely identified with their environments. A good example is English poet William Wordsworth (1770-1850) and the Lake District, where Wordsworth was born and raised. The Lake District, a beautiful area in northwestern England, is noted for its lakes, streams, waterfalls, and mountains. In 1799, Wordsworth made the Lake District his permanent home. The area filled Wordsworth with inspiration and the appreciation of nature, which is reflected in much of his poetry. 

These ten Vocabulary Words will be used.
  1. Irksome
  2. Malignant
  3. Farce
  4. Parody
  5. Jargon
  6. Rebuke
  7. Decrepit
  8. Pertinent
  9. Inconsistent
  10. Obligatory
Each word is provided with its syllables, pronunciation, part of speech, definition, examples, synonyms, and antonyms.


de·crep·it
dikrepit
adjective
in a poor condition because of old age or much use; dilapidated; worn-out.
He says his arthritis has made him decrepit.
These decrepit buildings should be torn down.
synonyms: broken-down, dilapidated, rickety, run-down, worn-out
antonyms: sturdy
farce
färs
noun
anything improbable, absurd, or empty of meaning; mockery; sham.
With just one candidate, the election was a farce.
in·con·sist·ent
inkənsistənt
adjective
not following a regular pattern; variable.
The results of the repeated experiments were inconsistent and gave little support to the researchers' claim.
She is talented but her performances are inconsistent in quality.
synonyms: changeable, erratic, inconstant, variable, volatile
antonyms: consistent, exact
irk·some
urksəm
adjective
causing annoyance; bothersome or tiresome.
He was tired of the irksome task of shoveling snow.
antonyms: absorbing, engrossing
jar·gon 
järgən
noun
technical or specialized words or language, as of a science or profession, sometimes considered to be unnecessary or confusing.
To be a successful lawyer you have to know all the legal jargon.
"A can of corn" is baseball jargon for a fly ball that is easy to catch.
synonyms: cant, idiom, lingo
ma·lig·nant
lignənt
adjective
evil or injurious in intent, effect, or character.
Malignant rumors about her husband cast a shadow over her happiness.
synonyms: baleful, baneful, evil, injurious, malefic, maleficent, malevolent, pernicious, sinister, spiteful, venomous, virulent, wicked
antonyms: benevolent, benign, benignant
ob·lig·a·to·ry
əblitōrē[or]oblitōrē
adjective
required; compulsory.
Military service is obligatory in quite a number of countries.
Physical education class is recommended but not obligatory for fourth year students.
synonyms: compulsory, mandatory, required
antonyms: optional, voluntary
par·o·dy
pa
noun
a humorous imitation in print, music, or performance of a serious person, work of art, or publication.
The spring musical, entitled "Spamlet, Prince of Cyberspace," is a parody of Shakespeare's play "Hamlet."
per·ti·nent
purnənt
adjective
of, concerning, or connected to a subject; relevant.
We may have to address that issue at some point, but it's not pertinent to today's discussion.
The students were intrigued by the topic and asked several pertinent questions.
synonyms: apposite, germane, material, relevant
antonyms: extraneous, immaterial, impertinent
re·buke
ribūk
transitive verb
to give a sharp reprimand to; criticize.
She rebuked him and called him a fool for giving away their secret.
synonyms: reprimand, scold, upbraid
antonyms: praise
author-img
Mr. ‏El-Sayed Ramadan ‎ ‎

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