HOLT Vocabulary Workshop Fourth Course - Lesson 9

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HOLT Vocabulary Workshop Fourth Course - Lesson 9

HOLT Vocabulary Workshop Fourth Course - Lesson 9




ax·i·om
akəm
noun
an obvious or generally accepted principle.
Practice makes perfect is a familiar axiom.
It is an axiom of politics that the more unhappy the voters are at election time, the more likely they will be to reject the party in power.
synonyms: postulate
com·pat·i·ble
kəmpabəl
adjective
able to exist or function harmoniously with another.
Your old printer may not be compatible with your new computer.
Fortunately, the three of us are very compatible roommates.
synonyms: concordant, conformable, congenial, harmonious
antonyms: discordant, incompatible, irreconcilable
com·pli·ance
kəmplīəns
noun
acquiescence or conformity.
I acted in compliance with your request.
Smoke alarms must be installed in compliance with the building code to prevent fires.
Strict compliance with the new regulation is expected of all clinic employees.
synonyms: accordance, acquiescence, assent, conformity, deference
antonyms: defiance, nonconformity
in·an·i·mate
inamit
adjective
not having or showing the characteristics associated with life; lifeless.
She claims she has no skill at painting people or animals and prefers to paint inanimate objects.
antonyms: alive, animate, live, living
in·de·struct·i·ble
indistrukbəl
adjective
not capable of being destroyed, damaged, or broken.
synonyms: deathless, immortal, immutable, imperishable, permanent
antonyms: breakable, destructible
in·nate
ināt
adjective
belonging to or existing in someone or some organism from the time of birth; inborn.
Shyness may be an innate characteristic in some human beings.
synonyms: inborn, inherent, native
antonyms: acquired
mu·ta·ble
bəl
adjective
able or likely to change.
A civil war seems to have been prevented, but the situation is mutable and there is still a risk.
synonyms: changeable, variable
antonyms: eternal, immovable, immutable
per·cep·tion
pərsepshən
noun
the ability to know through the senses.
prev·a·lent
prelənt
adjective
generally accepted; pervasive; widespread.
These surgical techniques were already prevalent at the turn of the century.
That a woman's proper place was in the home was a prevalent attitude during the 1950s.
synonyms: general, pervasive, standard, widespread
antonyms: rare
re·course
kōrs[or]rikōrs
noun
that which may be turned to for assistance, protection, or a way out of a difficult situation.
If they refuse to compensate you fairly, then your only recourse is a law suit.
The company was on the brink of financial collapse and had no recourse other than to lay off workers.
synonyms: resort, resource

Instruction: Complete these sentences using the words on this list.
axiom, compatible, compliance, inanimate, innate, prevalent, recourse
1. If they refuse to compensate you fairly, then your only _______________ is a law suit.
2. Strict _______________ with the new regulation is expected of all clinic employees.
3. I acted in _______________ with your request.
4. The company was on the brink of financial collapse and had no _______________ other than to lay off workers.
5. It is an _______________ of politics that the more unhappy the voters are at election time, the more likely they will be to reject the party in power.
6. Shyness may be an _______________ characteristic in some human beings.
7. That a woman's proper place was in the home was a _______________ attitude during the 1950s.
8. She claims she has no skill at painting people or animals and prefers to paint _______________ objects.
9. Fortunately, the three of us are very _______________ roommates.
10. Your old printer may not be _______________ with your new computer.





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